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twoday.net AGB

Genome-wide knockout mutants for E. coli K-12

Three years after the yeast set, a complete set of knockouts of all genes in E. coli K-12 was published in Molecular Systems Biology[s]. Mutants resulting from transposon mutagenesis were available for about half of the genes previously but this study used the popular knockout method by Datsenko and Wanner to target each gene specifically.

The same group reports[s] the sequencing of another closely related K-12 strain - and probably provides the best sequence information we have for genomes currently.

Next on my wishlist: A complete set of double or triple knockout mutants for paralogous gene families in E.coli or yeast.
Pedro Beltrao (guest) - 2006-02-22 17:39

what makes a bacterial cell

The 300 gene value is around the same things that other people have talked about for mycoplasma for example . I saw recently an interesting seminar here at EMBL by Martin Lercher. He talked about the Buchnera spps. , insect endosymbionts that have also very small genomes. He described a new method to predict the genome reduction that occurs in these species and the value that he predicts for the essential genes was around 250.

spitshine - 2006-02-22 20:05

Minimal genomes

We might have a stable minimal genome of 250-300 genes but I am not sure about the consequences of the finding. Buchnera and Mycoplasma are not free living organisms and might be in a state that resembles the early stages of the endosymbionts that are now considered organelles such as the mitocondrium. We could find even organisms that have removed genes we consider essential here.
Back in the day, I found it peculiar that 'minimal genomes' were considered when only two genomes were completely sequenced. Interesting though that the number seems stable ten years later.

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