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twoday.net AGB

Not in Kansas?

Many European scientists consider creationism a purely American issue and Kansas (e.g. as described at Pharyngula) won't happen here and there is hardly any need for a campaigning to defend basic scientific principles.

Recently there were several articles in the media (none in English afaics) about the invitiation of a know criticizer of evolution, the munich based microbiologist Siegfried Scherer, by the head of the state of Thüringen.
Our designated minister for education and science, Annette Schavan, studied catholic theology (as well as philosophy and education) and is a member of the "Christian Democratic Union" , the major right wing party (interesting for a laicistic state, eh?). However, few (including me) fear a similar discussion for German class room. I suspect that the issue will come up in near future nonetheless as technology and science are seen critical by the German public and that the discussion won't be easily dismissed.

American trends used to take about months to establish themselves in Germany - now we get both creationists issues and the church of the flying spaghetti monster at about the same time. There is certainly a lot of science criticism across the German political spectrum - christians on the right, a strong technology criticism on the left and with the greens. Our tight stem cell regulations were supported by critics of all parties. I just hope that the latent criticism in the general public stays with reading horoscopes and does not manifest in (more) overregulation. What's worse in the long run: a few creationist wingnuts or established beaurocrats?

[Afterhoughts: Well, substantial cuts in funding is obviously worse. And I am not going to mention that president.]

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